Monday, September 10, 2012

Article of the Week Period 1

Write a 3-5 sentence reaction to the following essay.  Be sure to reference the article.  Aim to get your voice across.  Comment on a classmates post if you have something to add/ say.

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/08/26/technology/cutting-the-digital-lifeline-and-finding-serenity.html?pagewanted=all

or here:
http://kellygallagher.org/resources/AoW%2012_02%20Turn%20Off%20Phone.pdf

16 comments:

  1. While reading this article, I started to understand more about the addiction people everywhere have with their phones. Whether it's texting, calling, or social-networking, it's still an addiction. People are so dependent on an electronic device for no apparent reason. A quote that stuck out to me was, "The ban threw me into a tailspin. I lingered by the locker where I had stashed my phone, wondering what messages, photos, and updates I might already be missing." This quote specifically shows the obsession with phones, and the anxiety that comes with them. I, myself, was phoneless for three months due to the fact that I broke mine and at first I thought I would never be able to handle it. After awhile I started to realize a nice, long break from your phone is actually peaceful. You don't have to deal with any drama and you can actually focus on important things like school work, your job, and getting things done. Now, I do depend on my phone for some things, but I have absolutely no problem turning it off for awhile unlike some people who really do need it every second of every day.

    Francesca L.
    Period 1

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  2. Life is always evolving, as is society. Reading this article reminded me of that, because while I’m fully aware the role technology plays in our lives today, it didn’t always. Texting and social networking are useful sometimes, but they shouldn’t necessarily play as vital a role as they do to some. “But for many people, smartphones and social networks have become lifelines — appendages that they are rarely without.” Oftentimes, when I decide to go to a friend’s house or some other type of social gathering, I end conversations and put my phone away when I arrive, just to find out that everyone else is just on their phones anyway. It’s a disconcerting feeling once you realize that nobody is really paying full attention to what’s going on in their current location. I hate having to fight technology in order for whoever I'm trying to have a conversation with to listen to me.
    -Amy B Period 1

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  3. Although I have a minimalistic phone and maintain few conversations through text messaging at one time, I feel that I can strongly relate to the plague of smartphone dependance. Many current devices are well-adapted to a medical professional or the like who need instantaneous information, not to a student who needs the occasional dictionary or note-taking functions for which I use my iPod or like the common use, which is for checking "stuff you need to act on right away,” My brother, on the other hand, suffers severely from phone-addiction, to a point that prohibits dinner-time conversation.

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  4. This article brings up and excellent point and makes us realize how dependent/attached we tend to be towards our phones/devices. It seems as if people would much rather be absorbed in their phones than spend time with friends. This is a serious problem and I think it will only get worse. The addiction to gadgets will only increase, as technology becomes more advanced. My phone does have importance to me but not to a point where I feel anxious and incomplete without it. I think people should use it to a limit. It's never good to be too attached to materialistic things.

    Ayeshra A Period 1

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  5. This article really shows how dependent people may be on their phones. People are so dependent it that is interferes with every day life. "The ban threw me into a tailspin. I lingered by the locker where I had stashed my phone, wondering what messages, photos and updates I might already be missing." This quote really stood out to me because it shows how worried she got when she realized she couldn't have her phone so such a short period of time. Also during that time she was with her friend and still worried about her phone. I do use my phone a lot but I have had it taken away so I'm not at the point where I need at all times. Sometimes it's nice to turn it off for a little while. I don't think it's a good thing for people to be so attached to something as simple as a phone.

    Jessica B Period 1

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  6. I found this article to be one of the most interesting articles that I have ever read. I am always the person to be attached to my phone, but I have never really seen it from this perspective. My parents always tell me to put my phone away at dinner or when I'm with friends, but sometimes it's impossible to not peek and see if there's a text message. As the article states, it "can sway our moods, decisions and feelings," which I strongly agree with. My friends, along with myself, are affected by the littlest technological problems every day, such as not getting a text from the person that we wanted one from. This article strongly made me think about detaching myself from my phone once in a while to take a look at what's really around me. Although I do like seeing what my friends are up to, this world almost seems better if we still had to call each other to see what we were up to. Technology has changed my life for the better, but definitely also for the worse.

    -Lizzy B Period 1

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  7. Being an avid technology user, this article is eye-opening and reveals points I’ve never even thought of acknowledging. One statement I agree with quite a bit is “Ask yourself: How important is this, really? How happy does it actually make you?.” I believe this quote really says a lot about usage of technology in general and raises the question to basically every American out there, “How important is that text message, tweet, notification? Etc.” The main idea I get from this article is to just live life how you want it, not how everybody else is living it and not to worry about what other people are doing.

    Cory W.
    Period 1

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  8. I know what it’s like to give up technology and I see how it makes me feel. When I do give it up I feel a lot better and I find myself using a lot more of my time efficiently. In the article Wilhelm Hofmann states, “‘It’s a problem of self-control.’” That is a big issue with me; when I use my iPod I get so in depth with it I don’t want to deal with anything else in my life and that’s a problem. The author also stated, “But for many people, Smartphones and social networks have become lifelines — appendages that they are rarely without.” I believe this statement to be very true. It seems like a lot of people are sucked into this big deal on what’s going on with everybody else’s life and keeping up on the latest with their friends.

    Jesse C. per. 1

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  9. After reading this article, I started to think about how much society has changed and evolved, and not always for the better. I am one of those people that always have my phone on me and now I think I would like to change that. It makes you wonder, if you're always on your phone and connected to the internet, are you actually enjoying reality and all that surrounds you? Probably not. "This tension may be inevitable at times, but it’s not inescapable. It’s possible to move beyond the angst that social media can provoke — and to be glad that we’ve done so. " This statement hits it right on the head, sometimes staying away from your phone or the internet can be good for your health and actually make you enjoy your life more. So now I'm going to give it a try!

    Anna Atkinson
    Period 1

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  10. I really like the concept of “JOMO”- the joy of missing out-coined by Anil Dash. Most often, there will be “friends” and family probably doing something really cool and sharing that “coolness” with the world, but we have a choice in how we respond. I do hope that over time, we will develop healthy habits and self-control over technology. Hoffman refers to these habits as a “screen diet.” I think it must be really difficult for young people to find “joy in a life that is less connected.” I give you all a lot of credit because as a teenager, I would have had a difficult time regulating my time with social media. I am curious about your reaction to Wortham’s revelation that we should “relearn the beauty of living in the moment, devoid of any digital link.”

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  11. When reading this article I agreed with the comment that the author made when she said, "My revelation — relearning the beauty of living in the moment, devoid of any digital link — may seem silly to people who are less attached to their devices." I am one of those people who are less attached to my phone, so it really does seem silly to me with the scenario with Jenna at the pool itching to have her cell phone while she is sitting with her friend and spending time with her. Honestly I think that is rude, if you are with someone you should give them your full attention and not be on your phone. It hurts my feeling when people do that to me, so I don't do that to them. I love my phone. it's so NICE to have; and I love the internet because it is so fun. these things don't control my life though, and that's where I feel it goes wrong. You cant let it control your life. I think a "cure" to this is staying away from these devices and doing something more fun! (Just as Anna said) I think it is a good experiment to stay away from your phone for a while, but I dont think a lot of people can do it. They are too attached!

    Rachel I.
    Per. 1

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