Monday, August 31, 2009

Grapes of Wrath- Post # 1

Guiding Question:
What can be learned from photographs from the Dust Bowl era?
Link to Dorothea's Lange's, "Migrant Mother":
http://lcweb2.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/i?pp/fsaall:@filreq(@field(NUMBER+@band(fsa+8b29516))+@field(COLLID+fsa)):displayType=1:m856sd=fsa:m856sf
Task:

Choose a photograph from the Dust Bowl Era. Include the link in your response/ blog comment. Write about what you believe the image conveys. You may use the following questions to help guide your response:
Why would the artist have taken the photograph?
Who do you see in the photograph?
Where do you think they are?
What can you tell about these people based on the photograph?
How do you think they feel in this picture? How can you tell?
What techniques does the photographer use to draw you into the subject matter or to draw an emotion from you?

64 comments:

  1. http://lcweb2.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/i?pp/fsaall:@filreq(@field(NUMBER+@band(fsa+8b29516))+@field(COLLID+fsa)):displayType=1:m856sd=fsa:m856sf
    “The Migrant Mother”
    I believe this photographer took this picture in order to capture the intense struggle and sadness that took place during the dust bowl. In taking this photo, she let the whole world see the reality of this tragedy that people might not have realized. In this picture, I see a mother who is thoroughly worn down by the troubles she has had to undergo because of the dust bowl. She has all the worries on the world on her mind and it is all overwhelming her. Not only does she have to look out for her own wellbeing, but she must also protect and care for her family. By the looks of things in the picture, they are probably on the road or in a car or van without much protection from the sun. It just strikes me as a scene in which the sun is glaring down on the kids and their mother and this is simply adding to the frustration and hurt that they are feeling. The photographer really wants you to connect with these people on a more personal and emotional level so that you can literally put yourself in their place and feel for them. One technique used is definitely the body language. The two kids give off a huge vibe of just exhaustion and you can picture them whining to their mom about the heat and everything that is going on because their heads are turned and tucked behind each of the mother’s shoulders. This gives off the feeling that they are almost trying to hide and block out everything that has been happening to them. As for the mother, she is trying her best to be brave for the family but it looks like she is crumbling under the weight of all of her responsibilities. And lastly, the fact that the picture is in brown hues, definitely gives off that look of dirty and dusty because that is the exact reason they are out of their homes and having to undergo trials.

    Emily. Period 3

    ReplyDelete
  2. http://lcweb2.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/i?pp/fsaall:@filreq(@field(NUMBER+@band(fsa+8b29516))+@field(COLLID+fsa)):displayType=1:m856sd=fsa:m856sf
    The artist could have taken the photograph to show how the families looked during the dust bowl era, he wanted to capture the insight to how they were feeling about everything at the time and the surrounding they say as well. In the photo I see a distressed mother and her two children whose faces were not shown. It looks like they could be outside of a tent possibly or even their home. I can tell just by looking at this photograph that the mother looks distressed and tired and the two children also look tired because of the way they are resting their heads on the mother’s shoulders. The technique that the artist uses to capture emotion in the photo would be a close up on the mother’s face including the two children who look innocent and also the black and white coloring gives it a depressed or saddened feel to it. The mother also has her hand placed to her face as if she is deep in thought wondering how she can make it better for her and her children and she also has that worried look, almost a questioning outlook on the entire thing like will it get better? And how can they make it better?

    Mary Period 3

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  3. http://www.schenectady.k12.ny.us/users/title3/Future%20Grant%20Projects/Projects/dustbowl/dust_bowl_boy.jpg
    I think this picture shows what kids went through during the dust bowl. The artist could have taken this picture to show how young children, such as little boys or girls went through during the dust bowl. In the picture it looks like a little boy outside coughing and covering his mouth and nose with his sleeve because there is so much dust. In the picture one could tell how kids during this time period couldn’t play as much and run outside anymore because there was too much dust they wouldn’t be able to breathe without breathing in the dust. The artist drew this picture to my attention because it was only a little boy going through a tough time.
    Cheyenne Period 3

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  4. http://faculty.washington.edu/gregoryj/exodus/fig7.jpg

    Dorothea Lange took this picture of a mother and her child in a cotton field, probably to show how even older women and young children had to work hard in order for a family to survive. Although the child looks miserable, it was necessary for the continuation of life. In this photograph, a mother is sitting with her daughter on the ground in a cotton field. Based on the photograph I can tell that the mother is tired and that she feels for her young daughter. The daughter is dirty and most likely taking a break from picking cotton, she looks exhausted and depressed. Looking at this picture I can tell how hard living in the Dustbowl Era was. Non-stop working and worrying about surviving seems to have taken over the mothers life, and the same goes for the daughter. I can’t imagine being five or six years old and having to pick cotton all day, or having my loved ones pass away. But at least they are working; a lot of people couldn’t even say that. The look that the mother has on her face shows that she is tired but she has some hope because her and her family has a job.

    Nicole period 3

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  5. http://cai.ucdavis.edu/steinbeck/dustbowl/dustbowlimages/dustbowlmotherindoor.JPG

    I think the artist took this picture to show what it was like during the dust bowl. The picture shows the family and their reactions towards what is happening around them. In this photograph you see one young girl, three younger boys, a woman holding a baby who looks like the baby’s mother, a man crouching down and another older woman who looks like the grandmother. It looks like the family is just outside of their house or where they live. I can tell that the three boys look like they don’t have a care in the world. It is obvious because they are smiling and look happy. The boys probably do not understand what is happening and don’t really care about anything. The young girl looks upset or angry, I think she also doesn’t understand what is taking place but is worried about the situation. The women holding the baby and the man squatting down know what is occurring and are probably very nervous for themselves and their children. The older woman has a look on her face that you can tell she is irritated and fearful of what the result of the dust bowl is going to be.

    Nicole C. Period-3

    ReplyDelete
  6. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Farmer_walking_in_dust_storm_Cimarron_County_Oklahoma2.jpg

    I think the artist took this photograph to show that even when something like this has happened, no one could really go anywhere except their own home. They didn’t have a warning, and they did have anywhere else to go in such a short notice therefore having to sit through it and try to carry on with their life doing whatever they could. In the photo I see a man and two boys, most likely a father and his sons. I think they are on a farm seeking some shelter in the barn. Based on the people in the photograph, they look like farmers. All their clothes look ragged and dirty like they’ve been outside all day. I think they might feel a little scared because they seem like they are walking swiftly towards the barn. The photographer uses black and white, and he doesn’t show faces. They picture is taken from a distance making me wonder what the peoples facial expressions might be at that particular moment.

    Jessica Period 3

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  7. http://memory.loc.gov/pnp/fsa/8b38000/8b38200/8b38213r.jpg

    The reason for the photographer’s picture could be that it really illustrates how families had to pick up and move practically everything they owned into cars and move away. From the photo you can’t tell if it’s one family traveling in two cars, or someone helping the other, then again it could be like the Joad's and two families combining to achieve a greater goal. The families hunched shoulders and warn clothing shows the battles they have had to sustain and how it has lead them to being stuck in the mud. The children clinging to their mothers for support is similar to the book and how the mothers, both Rosasharon and Ma, stepped up and provided and protected their families. This photo really conveys how families were willing to help others and were friendly and helpful. Although they have had to go through a lot themselves they are still willing to support and help others.
    -christina p3

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  8. http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/34/Dust-storm-Texas-1935.png
    The photograph shows an incoming dust storm in Texas. The photographer most likely took the picture to show the intimidating size of the storm before it hits an almost defenseless little town. I’m sure the people would feel afraid simply because the dust cloud looks like it’s over six stories high when compared to the houses below, let alone the thought of what the dust in the cloud could do to them, their houses, crops, etc.. When I look at the picture it’s fairly surprising because I did not think that the storms were that big and dense with dust.

    Amber Period 3

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  9. http://lcweb2.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/i?pp/fsaall:@filreq(@field(NUMBER+@band(fsa+8b29516))+@field(COLLID+fsa)):displayType=1:m856sd=fsa:m856sf

    I think that the artist took this picture to show how the migrants during the dust bowl felt. In this picture there is a mother with two children clinging to her. They seem to be in some kind of tent probably trying to stay out of the sun. By looking at the woman’s face, I can tell that she is busy thinking about something. She is very nervous and worried probably about her family’s condition. The children are positioned behind the mother and are hanging on to her. They are probably tired and upset because of their current lifestyle. The author positioned the mother in the center of the picture the bring the focus to her facial expression.

    Billy Per. 3

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  10. http://lcweb2.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/i?pp/fsaall:@filreq(@field(NUMBER+@band(fsa+8b29516))+@field(COLLID+fsa)):displayType=1:m856sd=fsa:m856sf
    The picture "The Migrant Mother" shows a middle age mother in 1936, a time period where the Great Depression was in full swing. The photographer, Dorothea Lange, took the picture in a camp for seasonal agricultural workers, and described being "pulled like a magnet" towards the woman in the photo. What makes this picture resonate is the fact that this is not a posed picture, nor is it one that tries to show human excellence; it is a photo that shows us as at what we may consider our worst. It is a photo that we can all connect with, yet none of us can fully understand. We can understand the anguish, the worry in her face, but we cannot comprehend the fight for survival these people went through. It is a photo that is both simple, yet complex. At a first glance, it is just a nameless woman with her children, but when one looks at it closer, the picture reveals itself. This isn’t just some woman; this is someone that we all can connect with. We can take her struggles and place them in our lives. This woman represents the struggles we all overcome on a daily basis, albeit at a lower level. In conclusion, the timeless appeal of this picture is not because of its setting, or because of its subject. It’s because this photo represents us, represents the daily grind that we take for granted.

    Matt, Per. 3

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  11. http://student.plattsburgh.edu/cblak001/images/8b29525v.jpg

    This picture is a different one that I found. I believe that it better illustrates the dust bowl era by the look on the child's face. In this picture, I learned that they had very little money and were struggling for a decent shelter. All they have is a single sheet to protect them from the dust. The artist probably took this photo to show the true misery that people were going through and the misery of a child. An interesting thing that I see in the photograph is that there is a plate in front of the family. The plate is completely empty, which could symbolize that they were starving. Also, I don’t see a father of the children in the photo, but I don't know if there is a father for them or not. The child's face looks like he is wandering off in his mind, wondering when he will eat next or how his family will get out of this struggle. The mom's face looks like she has worked extremely hard to care for the hungry kids and she just looks distraught. A suitcase near the camera shows that they may plan on moving or they just move constantly. I feel like the photographer tries to give you a picture of a family who has been through a tough time and can’t find a way out of it. They are hungry and moving a lot. The mother is tired, but she is still pushing forward for the sake of her family. Various ideas can be drawn from this distressing picture.

    ReplyDelete
  12. http://student.plattsburgh.edu/cblak001/images/8b29525v.jpg

    This picture is a different one that I found. I believe that it better illustrates the dust bowl era by the look on the child's face. In this picture, I learned that they had very little money and were struggling for a decent shelter. All they have is a single sheet to protect them from the dust. The artist probably took this photo to show the true misery that people were going through and the misery of a child. An interesting thing that I see in the photograph is that there is a plate in front of the family. The plate is completely empty, which could symbolize that they were starving. Also, I don’t see a father of the children in the photo, but I don't know if there is a father for them or not. The child's face looks like he is wandering off in his mind, wondering when he will eat next or how his family will get out of this struggle. The mom's face looks like she has worked extremely hard to care for the hungry kids and she just looks distraught. A suitcase near the camera shows that they may plan on moving or they just move constantly. I feel like the photographer tries to give you a picture of a family who has been through a tough time and can’t find a way out of it. They are hungry and moving a lot. The mother is tired, but she is still pushing forward for the sake of her family. Various ideas can be drawn from this distressing picture.

    Jeff Per. 3

    ReplyDelete
  13. http://www.treehugger.com/dust-bowl-climate-migration.jpg
    I think that the artist took this photograph because he or she wanted to capture the ferocity and destructive capability of the dust bowl. This picture portrays a town being enveloped in an enormous cloud of dust, and there appears to be no escape or hope. I think the people in this picture are somewhere in Oklahoma however, there are no people present because they are probably in their houses. The photographer captures an image of the inevitable destruction that people felt alongside the fear for their lives. You can tell because there is so much dust that it blocks out the sun. The dust is moving in a wave of animosity striking a warning in the peoples heart of the impending doom that is about to befall them. The angle that the photographer uses draws you into the photograph and gives you a much more three dimensional idea of what happened. Even if there was no color film, I would still have cast it in black and white to capture the simple destructive nature of the event.
    Nick Period 3

    ReplyDelete
  14. http://msnbcmedia3.msn.com/j/msnbc/Components/Photo_StoryLevel/080505/080502_DustBowl2.standard.jpg
    I think that the photographer would have taken this photo just to show hardships of the dust bowl. Even though not much is going on in this photograph, it can still say a lot about how the dust bowl had such a great, yet negative effect on people. In this photograph, I see what looks like a family. They look like they are running for shelter from the dust cloud that fills the rest of the photograph in the background. It almost looks like they are in the middle of a hot, dry dessert, even though it could very well be an everyday location in the east. I can tell that the family in the picture is somewhat calm yet very afraid at the same time. They don’t look like they are running for their lives, but running just for the sake of shelter. I can tell that this family is very close even though the young boy is staggering behind. The fact that the photographer took this picture right when the dust was coming behind this family running for shelter is very powerful alone. I think that he wanted to take it this way to convey the seriousness of the dust bowl and to tell the viewer, “This is what it was like. This is what people did in a situation like this.” To me, the huge cloud of dust makes the picture.

    Tom - Period 3

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  15. "The Migrant Mother"

    http://lcweb2.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/i?pp/fsaall:@filreq(@field(NUMBER+@band(fsa+8b29516))+@field(COLLID+fsa)):displayType=1:m856sd=fsa:m856sf

    The dust bowl era was so desolate and hopeless, looking at this photo you can understand the desperate feeling this mother has. It’s hard to imagine how she must be feeling, as mother how is she to provide for her children, where is the next meal coming from, will they find somewhere to live? You can tell they are destitute from where they are in the picture. It looks run down and disgusting the children in the picture are also grungy and seem too helpless to be children. Children always seem to have a happiness about them that never goes away, for them to have no joy; you can tell the situation was desperate. They just looked exhausted. They probably haven’t eaten for days and I’m sure their will to go on was thinning. You can tell the situation was miserable.

    Paul. Period 3

    ReplyDelete
  16. http://lascrucesblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2007/04/dustbowl-1935.jpg
    I feel that this picture conveys the true emotional affect that the dust bowl had upon people as well as showing the effects on the land.In this photograph there is a man standing on his land surrounded by dust.It is obvious based on the man's body language that he is very unhappy and probably getting ready to pack up and move on. He is looking down towards the ground slouching and looking like he can't care any more. This picture drew emotion from me because of the scene shot, you can see all the land that he had dedicated his life to and him becoming engulfed by the dust with it. Its almost like he wishes to die with his land and be one with it because, as the book says, every man loved his land like his own and losing it so quickly created a lot of grief in their hearts and i think this picture shows that.
    Margaret P.5

    ReplyDelete
  17. http://www.csub.edu/library/images/dustbowl.jpg


    This picture portrays a family whose only home is a tattered old tent. A mother and her children are sitting around the tent staring into the distance. There doesn’t seem to be a father with them, and it could be inferred that he is either searching for work, or food, or has abandoned his family. It appears that the tent is set up on the side of the road, or in a field. The photographer most likely selected this scene to illustrate to the rest of America the troubles that their fellow citizens are experiencing in the dust bowl. It is pretty obvious that the family in the picture has been through a lot of hardship in their recent past, and is beginning to feel anxious for work, and to reach their destination, as well as desperate for food, money, a steady, more protective home, and the feeling of security.

    Kevin, Per. 5

    ReplyDelete
  18. http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=dust+bowl+era&FORM=BIFD&adlt=strict#focal=ccf61b42fbf914fa7fda2b196888fd0e&furl=http%3A%2F%2Fcache.gettyimages.com%2Fxt%2F3231460.jpg%3Fv%3D1%26g%3Dha%26s%3D1
    Cat Period 7

    This picture really conveys the pain and severity of the living conditions during this time. In this picture a tenant farmer's wife is doing laundry with her toddler. They're both so dirt covered and have to live that way because they don't have the means to take a shower. The mother has an intense look of desperation in her eyes with no trace of hope. Her baby is playing in the dirt with an old jar because she has no toys to play with, and nowhere to play. The buckets the clothes are being washed in look dirty themselves and in the right corner behind her you can make out the flimsy pieces of wood that make out a shed, presumably her home. The woman is so skinny you can see her bones, she obviously malnourished. The photographer really captured the essence the time and was we can so easily see the pain behind her eyes. The black and white really makes the grime and dirt stand out. Just looking at this picture can make a person feel so much sympathy

    ReplyDelete
  19. http://data.tennessean.com/politics/wp-content/uploads/2009/03/grapes-of-wrath.jpg

    This is a picture of an average family during the Dust Bowl driving to California in search of work. You can see the father, who is driving, the mother, and their daughter. It is possible that there are more children in the back of the car. In this picture, the father is looking off into the distance with a worried expression on his face. During the time of the Dust Bowl, each family relied on the man of the house to protect them. In The Grapes of Wrath, it is stated, “No misfortune will be too great as long as the men remain whole.” Therefore, if the man of the house is concerned about something, the rest of the family will be as well. This is evident in the picture above. The father is clearly troubled by something he sees, resulting in the similar expressions by the mother and daughter. As we all know, this was a very stressful time for middle class families in America, and it is no surprise that the men, as well as the rest of their families, would have much to be worried about.

    Allie p.5

    ReplyDelete
  20. http://333maxwell.homestead.com/files/dust1.jpg
    "The Family Car"
    This is a photo of a family piling in the car they will travel to California in. The cars seem to be a very important object to travel. They are able to stuff all their belongings in the car with just enough room for themselves. I feel like the car symbolizes the strengths in the family. When the car breaks down the family has to work very hard to stick together and work through the bump in the road. The engine of the car represents the father of the family because he keeps everyone going and helps everyone keep up the pace. The body of the car represents the mother. The mother holds everyone together and keeps everyone strong. All her hard work to take care of each member of the family keeps the family sturdy. All the inside parts of car represent the children. The children are extra bodies to help out and keep the family a whole.

    Maria p.5

    ReplyDelete
  21. http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_lirt8srIYAI/SMBQsmiVbCI/AAAAAAAAAdA/Z6A8UimAnTY/s400/Dust+Bowl+Woman.jpg

    In this photograph I see a confused girl trying to think of possible ways to salvage her life in the terrible situation that she is in, which is the dust bowl. I think the artist took the photograph to show the pain and suffering that the people during the dust bowl era endured, and the fact that they could not figure out a way to help themselves out of the situation, no matter how hard they thought. I think that the girl is in the dustbowl during the dust bowl era. The reasons that I believe this are that she is wearing clothes commonly associated with the dust bowl era, the way the sky looks in the background, as if it is heavy with dust in the air, and also because of the barrenness of the ground that is visible behind the girl. I can tell from the people in the picture that the people of the dust bowl era were stumped as to how they could possibly live a happy, successful life. I can tell that she is feeling this way because she is biting her nails and looking down toward the ground with her eyes half-open. This look shows her sense of thought and contemplation, as well as doubt and despair.

    Buddy, Period 5

    ReplyDelete
  22. http://www.okcc.state.ok.us/Home/stewardship/dust-bowl_photo.jpg

    In this picture, a father and his two sons are running away from their house that is surrounded by dust. It looks as if their house has sunk into the ground. The family looks very distraught. They look like they are very poor and now they no longer even have their house because it is so destroyed. The photographer took this picture to portray how bad things were during that time. This photograph shows just one of many hardships that occured during that era. The family seems very anxious because they don't know if they will be able to survive because they have nothing. Techniques that the photographer uses to draw people in is how the picture is in black and white because this makes the dust seem even more intense.

    -Isabelle. period-5

    ReplyDelete
  23. http://www.mo.nrcs.usda.gov/news/MOphotogallery/Historical/dust%20bowl12.jpg

    This picture shows two little girls sitting in back of a dust filled car. The car seems packed away with necessities so the family is probably going to a new destination to live. The artist of this picture probably took it to show how people are suffering and trying to move along with their life to a better place. The artist draws you in because it shows all the emotion and what the surroundings are like during the dust bowl. It seems like the girl’s family is upset and just wants to get out of all the dust and have a normal life again without suffering. I can tell they feel that way because the girl’s faces seem anxious and upset, they look like they just want to be in a comfortable place. The family looks like they are just leaving home, packed away, and going to a new place to get away.

    Kayla, period 5

    ReplyDelete
  24. http://www.historyplace.com/unitedstates/lange/dor170.jpg
    The two farmers in the photo were probably chosen for it because of their time-worn faces filled with grit and the will to go on. Their time and effort put into their farm, probably the site of the photo, have taken their toll on the farmers’ wearied bodies and worn out clothes. The bags under the eyes of their expressionless faces show that they have been working long and hard to try and produce crop from their ever fallow fields. Cigarettes are a tool used by artists and photographers to imply sadness and pain, and seeking for a way out of the never ending monotony of the farmers’ lives. It causes pity, anger, sadness, compassion, and sympathy; all the while drawing out the iron will to change things that resides deep inside us all, only surfacing in times of intense emotion.

    Alex R- Period 5

    ReplyDelete
  25. This is a photo of the dust bowl. I think the artists took this picture because he/she wanted to show the world how big the dust storms were. Also to show what potential damage the dust bowl could cause. In this photo you can see the dust storm and houses in the path of it plus 2 people just standing there chilling. Based on the scenery and stuff I think this picture was taken in Stratford, Texas. I can tell by this picture that the people are thinking about what they are going to do after the dust bowl or maybe they are watching the storm to see how much damage there will be. I think the people in this picture are worried because they are pondering what they are going to do next. I think this because they are talking and it looks like they are discussing something. The photographer uses the overcast of the dust storm to make me look at the picture. When I saw the huge dust cloud I thought the picture was cool and decided to use it.
    Vinny P.5

    ReplyDelete
  26. http://www.shorpy.com/files/images/8b38282u.preview.jpg


    I think that the author took this photo in order to portray the distinct feel of the dust bowl era. When I look at this picture I can feel the boys loneliness and sadness and knowing that there's nowhere to go or a place to call home. I think that he is somewhere in Oklahoma because while reading Grapes of Wrath, this is how I imagined the land; desolate and plain. There is no real angle to the picture, just a simple straight look at what the dust bowl era was all about and how empty the land, lives, and world seemed to be throughout this time. I chose this picture because of its simple yet very powerful message to the world that the dust bowl era was such a horrible time to be living in because there was literally nothing to live for.

    ReplyDelete
  27. http://www.nasa.gov/centers/goddard/images/content/95249main_theb13651.jpg

    ^^^for Vinny G's comment

    ReplyDelete
  28. http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_bjqmGmHDb1w/SO21kMRywWI/AAAAAAAABN8/3RYEfsvmFrU/s400/Okies+headed+west+California+migrant+labor+dust+bowl+great+depression.jpg

    This is a picture of a migrant truck traveling to California during the Great Depression. As described in The Grapes of Wrath, the truck is way over stuffed and there is barely any room to sit. There’s is also a mother and her child sitting out by the side of the truck, probably waiting for her husband to return from finding a part that broke in the engine. I think it is amazing how often these people broke and set up their camp. Steinbeck writes about the Joads setting and breaking camp several times. Seeing how packed the truck is, just setting up camp for a night must be a very difficult task, they also have to put everything back in the truck and be on the road early in the morning. I think this is what made traveling so tiring for these families. If you put traveling on top of picking fruit and waking up early to go out to work, it is obvious why the families got so tired and eventually broke down and stopped trying to make a living.

    Jerry G P. 5

    ReplyDelete
  29. http://weareca.org/images/period05/b-dust-bowl/oakies-car.jpg

    I think the artist took this photograph because it conveys a perfect scene of what the cars looked like before and while they were traveling to California. In the photograph I see a lot of people smushed into a car that really shouldn’t be holding there capacity. In the picture I think they have just arrived in California but it is hard to read the script at the bottom of the picture. Based on the photograph I can tell that the people in it are not miserable but they aren’t thrilled to be jammed in the car. The man standing at the front end of the car seems exhausted, most likely from the trip and the children. I think the techniques the photographer uses are that he makes me feel bad for the people because he really captures the moment. I feel bad that the people have left their homes because they were practically evicted, I feel bad for them because now they have to find a job, and I feel bad for the agony the children had to endure during that long car ride.

    jessica period 5.

    ReplyDelete
  30. http://facstaff.gpc.edu/~pgore/students/w97/tanyacox/car.gif
    This photo conveys the struggle that the people of this time period went through. There are two men shown in this photo struggling to get their car out of what appears to be sand. The land around them is deserted except for a small home in the back and a rather run down gate to the side of the car. The photographer must have taken this photo to show what people where going through in this part of the country. This photo was exactly how I pictured the scene in The Grapes of Wrath in which the Joad’s car broke down and they had to pull aside. They seem to be off on the side of the road, but other than that there aren’t too many clues as to where they are. It looks to be a state like Oklahoma in which there is just empty land that seems to stretch forever. They could also be in the deserts of Arizona. These people seem to be rather well off. They are dressed nicely and have a nice car for that time period. The man even has a top hat on and the car looks totally unscratched. The poor people in this photo are struggling to get the car out of the rut that they are stuck in. The men are bent down and using all of their might. The men appear to be in a hole of some sort and there are deep tire tracks on the ground. The parallel lines of the gate and the tire tracks really draw me to this photo. I just look in horror at what these people had to go through. I complain about having to take out the garbage, but these people had to put so much effort to get this car out. They didn’t have a choice of pushing the car or not. To survive they had to get dirty and help the family. This photo really made me think about the grief that these people went through.

    Ryan, Period 5

    ReplyDelete
  31. http://newdeal.feri.org/images/i38.gif
    The image I have chosen shows how stretched certain families were during this time. It shows a real poverty and extremely haunting time. In this photo, there are five younger children and it looks like one teenage boy. This shows how even with the poor wages they received the food would have to be stretched, in this case, to feed ten people. Another important factor of this photo is how the mother is scraping the last bits of food out of the bowl. They needed every little bit of what they could get to survive. There was nothing wasted. Another perspective of this photo could be that the family has not left for California yet. In the background there seems to be the wrecked and stripped house. Also, the table and chairs seems like it would have come from their home. The fact that they are already stretching the food that they have seems to show that they are preparing for their journey and preparing to survive on what they have. I think that the man’s face in this picture is full of stress. He does not look pleased and he looks worried. It looks like one child at the end of the table has his head down. This may be from discomfort caused by a lack of food. Another reason is that possibly this child did not want to leave to go to California, unlike Ruthie and Winfield. I feel this is a powerful picture that shows some of the long term changes a family going through this would feel. If they survived, they would never waste food or any other supply again.
    Grace H. Period 5

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  32. http://mrkunkasclass.com/wp-content/uploads/2007/08/stranded-family.jpg

    This picture shows a stranded family from Texas on the road to California. If you look carefully at the faces, you don't see any hint of happiness. No one's smiling, no one's laughing... you just see the pain from their hardship. The father(?) is under the car, fixing it so they can continue onward with their journey, signifying that they wont give up. I believe the artist took this picture to show the struggles of the migration to California, and how it wasn't as easy as anyone would have thought. He or she wanted the world to see the pain and struggle that these families had to face on a daily basis. I think they wanted to shed some light on the “Okies” so those that were degrading them for all they've gone through would realize they didn't ask to be what they were or for how they had to live. The photographer made sure that the family was center in the picture so all the focus was on them, and not the landscape or the sky behind them. Also, most of the family isn't looking directly at the camera, but rather behind it, to some far off place that's only seen to them. I feel like it gives light to the hope they have within them that keeps them going- that gives them the power to continue to travel to California, rather than to turn around and go back home.
    Alyssa; Period 5

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  33. http://faculty.washington.edu/gregoryj/exodus/fig7.jpg
    I believe this picture conveys many feelings of sadness and depression. Just looking at their faces you can see exactly how they feel. Child labor was widely used in the picking fields. The families used all the resources they could in order to earn money. I believe the artist Dorothea Lange was trying to convey the pain the families felt in day to day life. I think she took this picture to show everyone who saw it that maybe they have a better life than other people and to appreciate what they have. This mother and daughter are in the cotton fields and it seems like they are taking a quick break. You can tell on the child’s face the pain and hunger she feels. You can also see on the mothers face the anguish she is going through having to make her six year old daughter work so hard.
    Erica. Period 5

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  34. http://www.dev.putnamcityschools.org/ImageGallery/PutnamCityNow/now0406dust7.jpg
    This photographer took this picture to show the actual truth of what was happening in the Midwest with the dust storm. A lone farmer is going to his field for his end of the year crops and all he has is a pile of dust with scraps of roots scattered across the top. The farmer in the picture looks very agitated and furious at this natural disaster that ruined his family’s future. I believe that he is on a farm in the Midwest, where the dust bowl hit the hardest. Gazing at this picture, you can tell that this man is very hard working with all the holes in his pants and the tattered shirt he is wearing. You can also tell he is a family man who was relying on this crop to feed his family during the winter, and now he is flustered with the thought of the unknown future of his family. The photographer uses the black and white motif to draw the sadness of the man and the people around him. You can see the disappointment in the man’s eyes. This is so closely similar to the Joad’s situation and to millions of other Midwest farmers. They go out to see their crops and only get devastated by the foot of dust that is killing their crop.

    Jonathan Period 5

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  35. http://student.plattsburgh.edu/cblak001/images/8b29525v.jpg
    The artist would have taken this photograph to demonstrate the effects of the Dust Bowl on the people, emotionally as well as economically. The photographer would have wanted people to comprehend just how difficult and despairing times were for those having to live through it. In the photograph, is a woman holding her two children in front of a tent surrounded by dust. I first noticed the obvious sadness and loss of hope in the eyes of the women and her children. The way she feels is transparent by the way she is sitting as well as the look in her eyes. Additionally, the woman looks so lost to the world, surrounded by a desolate and tattered living environment. Moreover, there is a empty food bowl in front of her, supporting the idea that they truly have nothing but themselves, which is supported by the way they are clinging to each other. She and her children are either on there way out west or in a Hooverville. The photographer drew my attention by putting the woman in the center of the photo. She sets the mood of the photo.
    Ella Period 5

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  36. The scene captured by this photograph is heartbreakingly beautiful. The young girl’s face, still innocent and naïve, portrays a life still ignorant to the hardships it will endure. Hers is the face of the Dust Bowl era. It is the perfect depiction of those who were forced to struggle daily among the poverty they were drowning in. Her fatigue can be observed if one examines the picture closely. She has not yet crumbled under the strain of hard work and incessant worrying. Unfortunately, despite her young age, she will be forced to mature and bear the weight of helping her family survive. This photograph depicts the helplessness of migrant families, the shame of the United States government, and the destitution that was faced by thousands of children at this time. The caption of the picture reads, “An Okie girl turned California migrant farm worker rises at 7 a.m. to pick cotton in 1936. She's one of 200,000 Dust Bowl refugees from the plains working in California.” After viewing this image, one is startled by the fact that such a young girl would be forced to work alongside her family in the fields. In our modern society, we often needlessly obsess over insignificant luxuries in our life. Our worries can not possibly measure up to those of this girl’s family. No mother wishes to force her young child to work. No father dreams that there will come a day when he will not be able to sufficiently provide for his family. Yet, in the dust bowl of the 1930's, the desires of migrant workers became immaterial. These men and women could do little more than survive with the meager food and supplies they were able to afford. The day that a child, who has not yet fully experienced all the joys of life, is forced to wake as the sun is rising to work arduously because her family may not be able to afford dinner, is the day that a society has failed. As the wind blows speckles of dust into this young girl’s eyes, her thoughts will not linger to fairytales and the games she will play on this day. She can not enjoy the simplicity of life; she can not join the millions of other children around the world who are waking up with a smile on their faces. Her world no longer allows for a childhood. The dust which has so fully encased every aspect of her existence, has also robbed her of her youth. This girl's silent plea can be heard in the way she rubs the dust away from her eyes. It can be heard in her already fatigued stance. This girl can not yearn for dolls, and pretty clothes. For now, she can only yearn for food.

    Delaram Period 5

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  37. http://www.life.com/image/72385337/in-gallery/23118/scenes-from-the-dust-bowl


    Delaram period 5

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  38. http://student.plattsburgh.edu/cblak001/images/8b29525v.jpg
    (Shrija.Period 3)
    This picture is trying to show us how poverty affected the lives of migrant families during the Dust Bowl era. In this picture, there is a woman in front of the dirty tent, holding a child on her laps. On her side, there is a little boy standing next to her looking hopeless and sad. The woman and her children seems to be starving from hunger. The plate that is laying in front of her on the suitcase is empty. This tells us how the family has nothing besides, each others company and the suitcase of course. The young boy looks so lost to the world. His eye seems to be seeking help. It looks like as if he is waiting for someone, to come and get his family out of this struggle. I think that the artist took this photograph because he or she wanted to show us how it was like to live in that era. Both mother and the children seem to be hopeless, unhappy, and tired of their life. The child that has his head down seems all sad and unpleasing. Since the father is not shown in this picture, may be the father has gone out somewhere in the seek of food. So, may be the mother and the children are waiting for his return by looking on the road. Just like other families, I believe this family seems to be also heading west. The woman with the child in the center of the photograph drew my attention.

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  39. "The Migrant Mother"

    I think that this photograph was taken because it expresses how many women felt then. In the photograph I see a woman who is confused. She is worried about her family’s well being and if they will be able to get through. Still, she wants to be strong and be positive that they will come out of this hardship successfully and move on into another chapter of their lives. I think the woman and her children have been traveling for a long time because you can see that she and her childrens’ clothing are torn and her face is tough and worn. I think before the depression and the dust bowl this family was well off and it wasn’t until this time that they began to struggle. In the photograph you get the feeling that she is thinking and searching for another option for her family. In her eyes there is a hint of shame, as if she disappointed her children.
    Rachel, Period Three

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  40. http://www.flickr.com/photos/myeye/3182214903/sizes/l/

    I think the artist took this photograph to capture how scary the dust bowl was for some people. Unfortunately, there are no people in this picture but the photographer and other people were still watching and experiencing it. They were probably very scared and didn’t have a full understanding of what was happening. These people on their farms or in their homes were literally seeing before their eyes their homes, their businesses, and many years of hard work going to waste. They might have known what was in store for them for the next couple of years or they might not have. Either way, it must have been a very sad and emotional time for people who had inherited farms and ranches that their grandfathers and great grandfathers had started.
    Austin per. 3

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  41. Task # 1

    http://student.plattsburgh.edu/cblak001/images/8b29525v.jpg

    I think the artist took this photograph because it portrays the feelings and emotions of the people as they were living through these harsh dust storms. The woman in the picture is surrounded by her children sitting in a worn out tent like shelter with the dust clustered around by their feet. Her facial expression is strongly demonstrated a feeling of despair and the young boy looks hopeless. I think these people are sitting in their home which is surrounded by their harvesting fields that are now covered in dust. In the distance I recognize the structure of a tractor or field tool that may be pulled by cattle. Based on the photograph these people look helpless. All of their crops or food source is covered in dust and they look very poor. By looking at the photograph I would assume that they don’t have much money at all and they rely on their fields a lot. The people are most likely in despair and helpless. There is nothing that they can do because their one food source and money source has been ruined. The picture clearly demonstrates this because the people are living in a makeshift tent, their clothes are worn out and raggedy, and they are looking off into a distance where I would assume that their harvesting field is which strong negative emotions. The photographer draws these emotions from me by really focusing the picture on the emotions coming from the faces of the family and blurring out the background.


    Kendra p.3

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  42. www. sharopy.com
    The image " dust bowl" shows two kids who are outside. The artist Dorothea Lange has taken the picture to show how children were affected by the depression. During the depression children were expected to work, and did not have much of a childhood. In this picture the children look tired seems like they have been working or have been outside all day long.


    Anjali period 3

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  43. Siena M period 3
    http://lcweb2.loc.gov/pnp/ppmsc/00200/00230r.jpg

    The artist took the photograph to show what families had to go through to get by in such tough times. In the picture, a mother and children are huddled under a makeshift tent surrounded by their few bare possessions. The people in the picture are obviously a migrant family traveling west to get away from the seemingly everlasting drought. The father/male is not in the picture; he is probably scrounging for food or looking hopelessly for work. There is a mother in the picture, and she is cradling a baby in her arms. The expression on her face is of exhaustion and annoyance. She looks upset that she has to put her kids through this, but can do nothing more than try to raise them on the road. There is a teenage girl sitting in an old rocking chair looking worn out but thoughtful, she is staring just below the camera in a look of deep thought. The children in the back are somewhat smiling and making a face. Their innocence has not been completely broken by the trip, but you can tell they are dirty and probably just as tired. I think these people are on the side of Route 66, just like the Joads in The Grapes of Wrath. My guess is they were driven from their homes by the drought and are headed to the west in hopes of being able to make a living. It’s a sad picture, because much of the hope that was probably originally there is missing in the picture. Their clothes and possessions are scarce and dirty, and their expressions are long. The artist draws the viewer in by making them the focal point of the picture and capturing their simple yet deep expressions.

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  44. I like what Christina from period 3 had to say about the picture she had chosen. it really seems like she understood why the artist made the photo the way he did and she easily compared it to the book.

    mary period 3

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  45. I like what Cheyenne P. 3 had to say because I think it is definitely important to think about how the kids felt during this dust bowl. Kids can obviously not deal with as much as adults can, when it comes to stressful situations and scary ones. Many times, they count on their parents for the will to survive. And lastly, it makes you appreciate, as a "kid" yourself, just how much freedom you have to go outside and not have to worry about being able to breathe because of the air quality. So all of these things were very nicely pointed out by Cheyenne.

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  46. I like what Cheyenne P. 3 had to say because I think it is definitely important to think about how the kids felt during this dust bowl. Kids can obviously not deal with as much as adults can, when it comes to stressful situations and scary ones. Many times, they count on their parents for the will to survive. And lastly, it makes you appreciate, as a "kid" yourself, just how much freedom you have to go outside and not have to worry about being able to breathe because of the air quality. So all of these things were very nicely pointed out by Cheyenne.

    ~Emily P. 3

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  47. http://www.weru.ksu.edu/new_weru/multimedia/dustbowl/big/usse5a.jpg

    This photograph shows the depression of this era. The look on the mothers face is worried and desperate. Her children are crowded around her and she looks like she is trying to comfort them in an odd way. Then in the background you can see the dust forming around their heads. If I was ever in that position I would be running around frantically trying to find shelter. She looks like she has almost given up.
    - Kait pelazza

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  48. http://newdeal.feri.org/images/i38.gif

    When I saw this picture, I really felt the emotion within it. The artist definitely felt the pain and suffering of the migrants of the dust bowl, therefore she must have wanted to take that picture. The artist intended to portray the severity of the dust bowl and how many people it truly impacted negatively. The industrial era destroyed the farmer’s lives and left them in the dust. These farmers could barely feed their kids, as shown in this picture. This family seems to be quite large, and with little food, the family suffered. This hot, dry, and excruciating dessert really set into the family. I can only imagine what they must have felt. If I had barely enough to eat, I don’t know how I would be able to survive. They artist might have used the sense of taste, to show how the b owl dust affected lives. During The Grapes of Wrath, Tom Joad didn’t have enough to eat, and was still hungry. This family looks exhausted and yet, they still stick together as a family.

    Nikin Shah
    Period 5

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  49. I agree with Mary in period three because she describes every point in the picture and i agree with her when she says that the mother looks like she's in thought and wondering how she could make life better.

    kayla, pr. 5

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  50. I like what Emily from Period 3 said about the picture. Although it's perhaps the most famous picture from the dust bowl era, I never really paid much attention to the children in the background. I agree with what she said about how they're trying to block out what's going on around them. What she said about the strong mother crumbling underneath the pressures of caring for her whole family in such a time really makes me connect with Ma Joad.

    Cat Period 5

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  51. This is a picture of an average family during the Dust Bowl driving to California in search of work. You can see the father, who is driving, the mother, and their daughter. It is possible that there are more children in the back of the car. In this picture, the father is looking off into the distance with a worried expression on his face. During the time of the Dust Bowl, each family relied on the man of the house to protect them. In The Grapes of Wrath, it is stated, “No misfortune will be too great as long as the men remain whole.” Therefore, if the man of the house is concerned about something, the rest of the family will be as well. This is evident in the picture above. The father is clearly troubled by something he sees, resulting in the similar expressions by the mother and daughter. As we all know, this was a very stressful time for middle class families in America, and it is no surprise that the men, as well as the rest of their families, would have much to be worried about.


    I agree with Allie's comment about how in each typical family in that era, the women depended on the husband to determine if everything would be alright. If the women saw a worried expression on the man's face, then they would break down as well. However, if the man looked angry, yet still somewhat content, then they would know everything would be okay in the end. This is an important observation because it shows that the man in the family back then would make all the important decisions.

    -Isabelle. per- 5

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  52. http://blog.syracuse.com/shelflife/2008/04/large_dustbowl3.jpg

    For Eight Years the dust bowl blew on the southern plains. Even the simplest actions in life were affected; breathing, eating, and even walking were all very hard actions to go about. This picture truly shows how much pain the dust bowl brought upon families. The artist, as I, must have been beyond doubt amazed by how this father and two children are having fun, playing together when all these hardships are occurring. The artist’s way of pulling us into this picture is amazing; seeing how their (what seems to be) house is wrecked and yet this father and two children find a way to keep each other happy, to keep each other together in unity. This family stayed strong and stayed together just like a family should; even when things are at their worst they still are together and love each other.

    Alexander Acunzo - Period 5

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  53. I agree with Isabelle. period-5 when she explains how the house represents the way the families are confused and don't know what to expect. Now that their home is gone seems to be a scary thought for the people.

    Maria p.5

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  54. i agree with what delaram of period 5 had to say and the picture she chose. The picture she chose, was extremely strong. These farmers lost their jobs, therefore affecting their kids. These kids would be have to be forced into work, leaving their childhood behind and entering the harsh real world of the dust bowl.

    nikin period 5

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  55. I thoroughly enjoyed the writing styles of Delaram from Period 5. I love the way that she described the growing up of the young girl. She vividly spoke of the way that the girl would have to grow up quicker due to the fact that her family needs her to mature and help provide for the family. Also I like the caption she quoted in her blog. It brings the full intensity of the era to the reader. I also conquer with her idea that our society today is too involved in the thought of wants when back in the Dust Bowl era they had to be concerned with needs. One thing I disagree with is that a society fails once a child has to go out and help work for the family. I believe if the child needs to help the family survive, they should be obligated to help and this isn’t societies fault, just the families. My favorite quote from her blog was, “The dust which has so fully encased every aspect of her existence.” It just sums up the whole idea of the dust era and she made me realize things I wouldn’t of, if I didn’t read her blog.

    Jonathan Period 5

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  56. I like what Kendra period 3 said because when I looked at her photo, some of the same vocabulary she used in her paragraph came to my mind and I basically thought the exact same thing as her.


    jessica period 5

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  57. I liked Nick's comment from period 3. The word "ferocity" perfectly captures the essence of this photograph. His description of the destructive power of the dust and the heavily disparaging effect it had on people’s lives is an accurate interpretation of the picture and of this era.

    Delaram Period 5

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  58. I like Buddy's comment from period 5 because I agree with him 100%. I like how he described the confused look on the girls face and I also like when he says that the people in the dust bowl era didnt know how to help the situation no matter how hard they thought.

    Vinny P.5

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  59. When the word "confused" appeared in Buddy's description, it also struck me that the children were dazzled by the journey that they would have to endure. The children may have thought many things as they traveled across the Dust Bowl with their families to places like California, but I think that all of them had some confusion in their mind. How would they adapt to their new environments? The children during this era surely must have been confused about why they were leaving their home for which they had only known as their only one; they must have been pondering how they would do things in a new place, but were simply baffled by the new changes they had to face.

    Will, Period 5

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  60. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  61. The photographer who took this picture may likely have captured such an image to detail the hardships of the farmers during the Great Depression era. The Dust Bowl period/ area heavily impacted the people in the region in terms of their farming duties. However, even though the conditions were outright horrendous and unsuitable for most kinds of agriculture, this picture represents the spirit of many farmers before they gave way to the incoming tractors. The woman depicted here looks old and hardened by the landscape. She seems to have tamed the "Wild West", only to face the new and unexpected drought to hit the Dust Bowl. These farming people were determined to make a living for themselves; they tried their best in these harsh conditions in order to sustain themselves and their family. As what can be seen in the photo, the landscape is quite barren; the drought devastated the farmers, leaving them with little to no revenue. as they were forced to migrate west, these farmers had nothing to head west with, save for some spare change that they had accumulated over their years of hard work. The barren landscape represents the journey across the land to California, where they [migrants] would also have to endure a period of hardship full of discrimination and low wages. The struggle in the woman's face also reflects the struggle in those of the faces of the migrant workers; each toiled restlessly so they could provide for their family. The woman in the photograph probably is confused and stressed to help provide for the family; they continue to try to till their land and raise whatever crops they can instead of heading out west for work. The caption provides evidence for this, stating she is trying to raise her second planting of vegetables. Instead of giving up, the persistent farmers decided to challenge mother nature and the near-imperialistic nature of the "banks". Farmers would stay on their rightfully owned land to milk whatever they could out of what was left in the aftermath of the drought. Clearly, the photographer concentrated on the bleak side of farming in the Dust Bowl. The depiction of barrenness just overwhelms the mind with how the farmers could survive in the Dust Bowl for the long period of time they did due to the lack of nutrition and resources. This image can directly relate to the Joads; Grandpa Joad was reluctant to leave the land he had tilled for so long in his life.

    Will, Period 5

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  62. i agree and like the points said by the person who started with "I think that the author took this photo in order to portray the distinct feel of the dust bowl era." there really wasnt much to live for yet people kept going.

    - Christina p3

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  63. When Kait from period 5 mentioned how the "Migrant Mother" seemed to be "comforting [her children] in an odd way", it made me realize that this mother didn't even know how to comfort herself at the time. It is no wonder that she is so distraught in this picture. Not only does she have to act like everything is okay for her children, but for herself as well. I can only imagine how difficult this must have been.

    Allie p.5

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  64. I very much agree with rachel period 3 and her analysis on the Migrant Mother. I felt like when I was reading what she thought about the picture and what she personally saw within the picture, I agreed with almost everything that she said and I saw almost the same exact thing. I can relate very much with her post and what she wrote and I strongly feel that If I would have done my post on The Migrant Mother, my post would look very similar to Rachel's.

    Tom - Period 3

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